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Gardner Rea Cartoons 

Gardner Rea Cartoons

Many of (Oscar) Gardner Rea's works appeared in the New Yorker magazine during the 1920 and 1930's, and earlier in Judge and Life (the humor magazine, not the later picture magazine). Rea Irvin, the long time de facto "art director" of the New Yorker, drew in a similar style to Gardner Rea; and the editors of the magazine (for reasons apparently unknown) are said to have sometimes credited one for the other’s work.  I have yet to find a definitive catalog of Gardner Rea's work. Should any of the works shown in this album not be that of Gardner Rea, I would appreciate being informed.

Two Life magazine covers in my personal collection when offered for sale were attributed to Gardner Rea, when in actuality they appear to have been by the artist Rae Irwin.  More than two years after I purchased them, and had had the magazines conserved and framed, I happened to notice that they were signed "Rea Irvin."  While they are not included in this album, their style are so similar to that of Gardner Rea's of the same period, it is easy to see how the work of the two could be confused.


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Matches 1 to 26 of 26     » Thumbnails Only    

   Thumb   Description   Linked to 
1
Gardner Rea Self Portrait
Gardner Rea Self Portrait
 
 
2
Gardner Rea.  Judge magazine cover, December 18, 1926
Gardner Rea. Judge magazine cover, December 18, 1926
 
 
3
Gardner Rea.  'Another Good Girl Gone Wrong.' Judge Magazine Cover.  March 26, 1927
Gardner Rea. "Another Good Girl Gone Wrong." Judge Magazine Cover. March 26, 1927
 
 
4
Gardner Rea: 'Sex of One, Half a Dozen of the Other.'  Judge magazine.  August 20,1927
Gardner Rea: "Sex of One, Half a Dozen of the Other." Judge magazine. August 20,1927
 
 
5
Gardner Rea:  New Yorker Cover, 4 February 1928
Gardner Rea: New Yorker Cover, 4 February 1928
.. "You know Gus. $65 a case." 
 
6
Gardner Rea:  New Yorker Cover, August 23, 1930
Gardner Rea: New Yorker Cover, August 23, 1930
 
 
7
Gardner Rea:  Life magazine cover, November 28, 1930
Gardner Rea: Life magazine cover, November 28, 1930
 
 
8
Gardner Rea:  New Yorker Cover June 27, 1931
Gardner Rea: New Yorker Cover June 27, 1931
 
 
9
Gardner Rea.  New Yorker Cover, November 25, 1933
Gardner Rea. New Yorker Cover, November 25, 1933
 
 
10
Gardner Rea: 'Yes Sir, in my day I've cost the State of New York a pretty penny'
Gardner Rea: "Yes Sir, in my day I've cost the State of New York a pretty penny"
 
 
11
Gardner Rea:  'When you say 'at slight additional cost,' General, can you be more specific--one billion, two billion?'
Gardner Rea: "When you say 'at slight additional cost,' General, can you be more specific--one billion, two billion?"
 
 
12
Gardner Rea: 'Quite an interesting experiment, don't you think?  I understand some of our best families are back of it'
Gardner Rea: "Quite an interesting experiment, don't you think? I understand some of our best families are back of it"
 
 
13
Gardner Rea: 'Don't You worry, Mrs. McGovern---he'll be back.'
Gardner Rea: "Don't You worry, Mrs. McGovern---he'll be back."
A blogger commented on this 5 Sep 1936 New Yorker cartoon:
"Sexist cartoons were commonly published at the time in many mainstream media including the New Yorker, and many of them were to my mind quite funny. Yet I do not recall very many cartoons that tried to make a joke about violence against women. It is not a chuckle cartoon but a political/social commentary, as were most of Rea's cartoons.

"Here we have a single panel gag cartoon about a victim of wife-beating--domestic violence or spousal abuse in today's parlance--being consoled ineptly by a supposed friend. I see nothing humorous about this situation. The victim has a black eye and the plaster on the wall is broken, presumably by the force of her impact. What on earth were the editors thinking?"

I think the blogger entirely missed Rea's point. While the conventional wisdom of the time was that a woman should suffer the abuse of one's husband willingly -- better to be beaten than abandoned. Rea was pointing to the foolishness of this view. It was a strong anti-sexist statement. 
 
14
Gardner Rea: 'Vote Twice for Honest Ed Boggs'
Gardner Rea: "Vote Twice for Honest Ed Boggs"
 
 
15
Gardner Rea:  'Noisy Damn (Mushroom, Toadstool)!'
Gardner Rea: "Noisy Damn (Mushroom, Toadstool)!"
 
 
16
Gardner Rea:  No Caption
Gardner Rea: No Caption
 
 
17
Gardner Rea:  'Aren't you ashamed of yourself--holding up the government for two billion dollars'
Gardner Rea: "Aren't you ashamed of yourself--holding up the government for two billion dollars"
 
 
18
Gardner Rea:  'I am pleased to report, gentlemen, that the profits for the last month have been $7,800,000--including, of course, the government fine.'
Gardner Rea: "I am pleased to report, gentlemen, that the profits for the last month have been $7,800,000--including, of course, the government fine."
 
 
19
Gardner Rea:  'But don't you see, if we had a fascist dictator, we'd all go on war-time rations--and then we'd soon be nice and thin.'
Gardner Rea: "But don't you see, if we had a fascist dictator, we'd all go on war-time rations--and then we'd soon be nice and thin."
 
 
20
Gardner Rea:  'Now this next telegram, Mr. Forsythe: 'Wiggy misses his Sweet Pie and hopes she isn't mad at him any more.'  That, this committee takes it, is code?'
Gardner Rea: "Now this next telegram, Mr. Forsythe: 'Wiggy misses his Sweet Pie and hopes she isn't mad at him any more.' That, this committee takes it, is code?'
 
 
21
Gardner Rea:  'See the pretty putt-putt'
Gardner Rea: "See the pretty putt-putt"
 
 
22
Gardner Rea:  'The Army Flies the Mail.  Special delivery, lady.'
Gardner Rea: "The Army Flies the Mail. Special delivery, lady."
 
 
23
Gardner Rea:  'The Conference'
Gardner Rea: "The Conference"
 
 
24
Gardner Rea:  'Some Women will go to any extreems just to have their pictures taken. '
Gardner Rea: "Some Women will go to any extreems just to have their pictures taken. "
 
 
25
Gardner Rea:  'Where I Made My Mistake was in Feeding Them'
Gardner Rea: "Where I Made My Mistake was in Feeding Them"
.. Window Washer Feeds Birds 
 
26
Gardner Rea:  'They asked for bread'
Gardner Rea: "They asked for bread"
NEW MASSES (October 6, 1936) -"The New Masses, published from 1926 until 1948, was an American Marxist magazine closely associated with the Communist Party, USA. With the coming of the Great Depression in 1929 America became more receptive to ideas from the political Left and The New Masses became highly influential in intellectual circles. The magazine has been called “the principal organ of the American cultural left from 1926 onwards." This cartoon is a particularly good example of the characteristic sparseness of Rea's outlines. 
 

Linked to Oscar Gardner Rea, ^

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